Featured Courses

Original Credit

Criminology

Criminology

In today’s society, crime and deviant behavior are often one of the top concerns of society members. From the nightly news to personal experiences with victimization, crime seems to be all around us. In this course, we will explore the field of criminology or the study of crime. In doing so, we will look at possible explanations for crime from psychological, biological, and sociological standpoints, explore the various types of crime and their consequences for society, and investigate how crime and criminals are handled by the criminal justice system. Why do some individuals commit crimes but others don’t? What aspects in our culture and society promote crime and deviance? Why do individuals receive different punishments for the same crime? What factors shape the criminal case process, from arrest to punishments.

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Journalism: Investigating the Truth

Journalism: Investigating the Truth

Are you always the first one to know what’s going on at school or in your town? Maybe your Facebook or Instagram accounts are the reliable place for others to find the latest breaking news? If so, you are just the kind of person every online, print, and broadcast news outlet is searching for, and Journalism: Investigating the Truth is the perfect course for you! Learn how to write a lead that really “grabs” your readers, interview sources effectively, and write engaging news stories. You will explore the history of journalism and see how the modern world of social media can provide an excellent platform for news. Turn your writing, photography, and collaborative skills into an exciting and rewarding journalism career.

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Native American Studies

Native American Studies

This course employs the 7 Essential Understandings about Montana Indians as a framework or organizing principle; students will investigate each of the 7 EUs in depth with use of primary sources from the 12 Montana tribes throughout, and an emphasis on critical thinking, interaction with others, and digital projects that display understanding of the course content.

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Music Appreciation

Music Appreciation

This course will use an overview of music theory and music history to create a foundation on which each student can build a deeper appreciation of all music. There is no prerequisite for this course; those of you with a musical background may find some activities easy, but everyone can access and learn from this course content.

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MTDA Book Club: Utopian & Dystopian Literature

MTDA Book Club: Utopian & Dystopian Literature

Have you wanted to read interesting books and talk to others about them? Have you ever wondered what The Hunger Games, “The Lottery” and 1984 have in common? Have you found dystopian literature and films fascinating? If so, this discussion-based book club is for you! This class will introduce you to the concepts of utopia and dystopia, show you how to discuss books productively, and help you develop your analytical skills while you apply these themes to our current world.

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Creative Writing

Creative Writing

This creative writing course will develop observation and reflection skills as well as develop the creative use of grammar in the writing process. Students will hone skills as they utilize a variety of technology to write for a variety of audiences, share writing with others, and give constructive feedback to peers. This is not a course to write for only yourself or to avoid communicating with a variety of peers. Students will study excellent creative writing in books of their choice.

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Computer Science I: Joy and Beauty of Computing

Computer Science I: Joy and Beauty of Computing

The goal of this course is to teach you to think like a computer scientist. This way of thinking combines some of the best features of mathematics, engineering, and natural science. Like mathematicians, computer scientists use formal languages to denote ideas (specifically computations). Like engineers, they design things, assembling components into systems and evaluating tradeoffs among alternatives. Like scientists, they observe the behavior of complex systems, form hypotheses, and test predictions. The single most important skill for a computer scientist is problem solving. Problem solving means the ability to formulate problems, think creatively about solutions, and express a solution clearly and accurately. As it turns out, the process of learning to program is an excellent opportunity to practice problem solving skills.

This course is offered with a dual-credit option with Helena College.

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Montana Digital Academy
Phyllis J. Washington College of Education
The University of Montana
32 Campus Drive – Room 315
Missoula, Montana 59812
Phone: 406-203-1812
Fax: 406-203-1815

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