Featured Courses

Original Credit

Computer Science I: Joy and Beauty of Computing

Computer Science I: Joy and Beauty of Computing

The goal of this course is to teach you to think like a computer scientist. This way of thinking combines some of the best features of mathematics, engineering, and natural science. Like mathematicians, computer scientists use formal languages to denote ideas (specifically computations). Like engineers, they design things, assembling components into systems and evaluating tradeoffs among alternatives. Like scientists, they observe the behavior of complex systems, form hypotheses, and test predictions. The single most important skill for a computer scientist is problem solving. Problem solving means the ability to formulate problems, think creatively about solutions, and express a solution clearly and accurately. As it turns out, the process of learning to program is an excellent opportunity to practice problem solving skills.

This course is offered with a dual-credit option with Helena College.

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Criminology

Criminology

In today’s society, crime and deviant behavior are often one of the top concerns of society members. From the nightly news to personal experiences with victimization, crime seems to be all around us. In this course, we will explore the field of criminology or the study of crime. In doing so, we will look at possible explanations for crime from psychological, biological, and sociological standpoints, explore the various types of crime and their consequences for society, and investigate how crime and criminals are handled by the criminal justice system. Why do some individuals commit crimes but others don’t? What aspects in our culture and society promote crime and deviance? Why do individuals receive different punishments for the same crime? What factors shape the criminal case process, from arrest to punishments.

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Music Appreciation

Music Appreciation

This course will use an overview of music theory and music history to create a foundation on which each student can build a deeper appreciation of all music. There is no prerequisite for this course; those of you with a musical background may find some activities easy, but everyone can access and learn from this course content.

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Anatomy & Physiology

Anatomy & Physiology

In this Health elective, students will explore the anatomy or structure of the human body. In addition to learning anatomical terminology, students will study the main systems of the body– including skeletal, muscular, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, reproductive, and nervous systems. In addition to identifying the bones, muscles, and organs, students will study the structure of cells and tissues within the body.

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Creative Writing

Creative Writing

This creative writing course will develop observation and reflection skills as well as develop the creative use of grammar in the writing process. Students will hone skills as they utilize a variety of technology to write for a variety of audiences, share writing with others, and give constructive feedback to peers. This is not a course to write for only yourself or to avoid communicating with a variety of peers. Students will study excellent creative writing in books of their choice.

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Native American Studies

Native American Studies

This course employs the 7 Essential Understandings about Montana Indians as a framework or organizing principle; students will investigate each of the 7 EUs in depth with use of primary sources from the 12 Montana tribes throughout, and an emphasis on critical thinking, interaction with others, and digital projects that display understanding of the course content.

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Oceanography

Oceanography

Oceanography provides an excellent opportunity to gain knowledge about the biological, physical, and chemical properties of marine ecosystems. Through an interdisciplinary approach, the oceanography topics are explored through hands-on labs, research projects and video field trips. Oceanography encourages students to investigate both the marine world and the environmental issues that people must consider when using the oceans many resources.

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Psychology

Psychology

Psychology is the study of the human mind and human behavior. This one-semester course covers topics such as history, research, biopsychology, sensation and perception, consciousness, learning, memory, intelligence, personality, psychopathology and therapy. Coursework integrates multicultural approaches and themes to make psychology meaningful to students of diverse backgrounds.

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Advanced Placement®

AP® Art History

AP® Art History

Within AP Art History, students will explore the interconnections between art, culture, and historical context using critical analysis through the critical lenses of artistic expression, cultural awareness, and purpose. Using a defined art historical skill set and reflective learning, students will analyze relationships across cultures with a global lens. The examination of how people have responded to and communicated their experiences through art will enable students to think conceptually about art ranging from prehistoric to contemporary. Students will be active participants, engaging with art and its context as they read, research, and collaborate to learn about art, artists, art making, and responses to and interpretations of art.

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AP® Biology

AP® Biology

The AP Biology course is a year‐long course designed to be the equivalent of a college introductory biology course usually taken by biology majors during their first year of college. Non‐science majors often use this course to fulfill a basic requirement for a laboratory‐science course. Primary emphasis in this course will be on developing an understanding of concepts rather than on memorizing terms and technical details. Cell’s structure, chemistry and physiology as well as genetics are taught in the first semester.

Second semester encompasses diversity and physiology of organisms as well as ecology. Evolutionary relationships are taught in both semesters.

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AP® Calculus

AP® Calculus

AP® Calculus AB is a college-level course that prepares students for the AP® Calculus AB exam. Before studying calculus, all students should complete four years of secondary mathematics designed for college-bound students. Students will demonstrate learning using multiple methods; analytic, algebraic, numerical, graphical, and verbal. Students must be familiar with the properties of functions, the algebra of functions and the graphs of functions. Students must also understand the language of functions and know the values of the trigonometric functions of the numbers 0, pi/6, pi/4, pi/3, pi/2 and their multiples. Explorations are used to actively involve students in the understanding of calculus and solve problems by developing math models, solve, confirm, and interpret the solution then communicating their understanding by verbalizing and in written sentences. Multiple methods are used to represent problems often times emphasizing the connection among these representations.

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AP® Computer Science A

AP® Computer Science A

AP® Computer Science prepares students for the AP* exam in May. This course is comparable to a college-level introductory computer programming course. The course develops the skills required to write programs or parts of programs used to correctly solve specific problems. Students will learn design techniques to make programs understandable, adaptable, and reusable. Focus is on the Java programming language, a cross-platform language that will enable students to develop programs that can be run in a variety of environments (Windows, Mac, Linux, Android, etc.). Skills learned in this course will aide in many ways, regardless chosen profession field. And, perhaps most importantly, studying computer science opens up a creative world to students unlike any other.

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AP® Environmental Science

AP® Environmental Science

The goal of Environmental Science is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world and to identify and analyze environmental problems that are natural and human-made. Students will evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems and examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing problems. Laboratories support student content mastery with hands-on experiences.

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AP® Government and Politics

AP® Government and Politics

Advanced Placement US Government and Politics course consists of 7 modules covering the structure of US government, its operations and politics in America. Each semester deals with 4 of these modules. Students must read and understand the text and complete multiple choice quizzes and tests (1 per module) as well as a proctored final exam for each semester.

A student who takes the College Board exam in May must score at least a 3 (out of 5) to earn credit at most colleges or universities. A score of 3 will normally earn 3 semester credits at a Montana university or college. In order to earn a score of 3 or above a student must be able to score 60% or higher on the College Board exam, which consists of 60 multiple choice questions and 4 free response questions.

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AP® Human Geography

AP® Human Geography

The AP® Human Geography course is designed to provide college level instruction on the patterns and processes that impact the way humans understand, use, and change Earth’s surface. Students use geographic models, methods, and tools to examine human social organization and its effect on the world in which we live. Students are challenged to use maps and geographical data to examine spatial patterns and analyze the changing interconnections among people and places.

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AP® Language and Composition

AP® Language and Composition

This course is a demanding, college-level class that prepares students for the AP® English Language and Composition exam in May. Students focus on becoming skilled readers of prose written from different time periods and rhetorical contexts, as well as becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Emphasis is on expository, analytical and argumentative writing that forms the basis of academic and professional communications, as well as the personal and reflective writing that fosters the ability to write in any context. Students should check with their intended college to see which AP® English exams may exempt them from freshmen English composition requirements.

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AP® Literature & Composition

AP® Literature & Composition

This course is a demanding, college-level class that prepares students for the AP® English Language and Composition exam in May. While enrolled in the MTDA AP® Literature and Composition course students will engage in close reading (active and thoughtful) of literary works in a rigorous, college-level curriculum. Through the deep study of works of literary merit, students will sharpen their awareness of language and how writers use language to create meaning. In addition, students will develop an independent appreciation of literary works while becoming sensitive to literature as shared experience. Students will discuss and write about the individual work (novels, plays, poems, essays) as well multiple sources. This course’s literary study will look at style and structure, diction, figurative language, imagery, selection of detail, language, tone and syntax. Writing well about literature is a key component of the course. In addition to essay writing, students will be expected to write clear, supported posts and responses in threaded discussion.

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AP® Macroeconomics

AP® Macroeconomics

Understand the choices you make as a producer, consumer, investor, and taxpayer. This course provides you with the knowledge and decision-making tools necessary for understanding how a society must organize its limited resources to satisfy its unlimited wants.

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AP® MIcroeconomics

AP® MIcroeconomics

The AP® Microeconomics course provides students with an understanding of the principles of economics as they apply to individual decision-making units, including individual households and firms. The course examines the theory of consumer behavior, the theory of the firm, and the behavior of profit-maximizing firms under various market structures. Students evaluate the efficiency of the outcomes with respect to price, output, consumer surplus, and producer surplus. They examine the behaviors of households and businesses in factor markets, and learn how the determination of factor prices, wages, interest, and rent influence the distribution of income in a market economy. There are ample opportunities to consider instances in which private markets may fail to allocate resources efficiently and examine various public policy alternatives aimed at improving the efficiency of private markets. By taking on the role of a leader at a fictitious company, you will learn fundamental economic concepts, including scarcity, opportunity costs and trade-offs, productivity, economic systems and institutions, exchange, money, and interdependence.

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AP® Psychology

AP® Psychology

The AP Psychology course introduces students to the systematic and scientific study of human behavior and mental processes. While considering the psychologists and studies that have shaped the field, students explore and apply psychological theories, key concepts, and phenomena associated with such topics as the biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and cognition, motivation, developmental psychology, testing and individual differences, treatment of abnormal behavior, and social psychology. Throughout the course, students employ psychological research methods, including ethical considerations, as they use the scientific method, analyze bias, evaluate claims and evidence, and effectively communicate ideas.

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AP®  Statistics

AP® Statistics

This course is designed to provide college-level instruction on the concepts and tools for working with data. Students collect and analyze data and draw conclusions based on real-world information. The course challenges students to explore patterns, think critically, use a variety of tools and methods, and report their findings and conclusions.

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AP® US History

AP® US History

AP® United States History prepares students for the AP* exam in May. This rigorous course provides students with the necessary skills to critically analyze events in United States history. Students learn to assess historical materials and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship.

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Montana Digital Academy
Phyllis J. Washington College of Education
The University of Montana
32 Campus Drive – Room 315
Missoula, Montana 59812
Phone: 406-203-1812
Fax: 406-203-1815

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